Marketing August 4, 2010 Last updated August 10th, 2010 2,142 Reads share

Using Radio to Communicate with Customers

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One morning, I was listening to Ray D’Arcy and his team discussing what to do when your blouse won’t stretch across your chest. It just so happens that one of my clients stocks a gadget that solves that very dilemma. I texted into the show and the team made several mentions of her business. Later, I rang the client and asked had she received any extra interest. She had noticed a spike in the number of hits to her website and she also received an order.

In the rush to grab the headlines or build an online presence, businesses often forget about radio as a marketing medium. Yet JNLR radio listener statistics regularly show that between 85 and 90% of Irish adults listen to radio, many of them daily. Though they may be listening with half an ear, they’re a captive audience; radio is part of their daily routine. Radio gives you a ready-made opportunity to communicate directly with your customers.

Advantages of Radio

People are often a little afraid of radio, because they think of all the thousands of people listening. Radio is the most intimate of all mediums. You’re really only talking to one person at a time, while they’re in the car, at work, doing the washing, or lying in bed. A good broadcaster will add to the feeling that you’re having a one to one conversation. They will ease your nerves and give you a chance to show off your expertise. And who doesn’t enjoy an opportunity to demonstrate what they’re passionate about.

Where Can You Broadcast Yourself

Business Programmes: RTE, Today FM and Newstalk have weekend business shows with slots for new businesses.  Newstalk tend to favour opinions about business best practise, or angles on current business news stories. RTE take a more lifestyle-oriented approach, featuring quirky business ideas and discussions on work- life balance.

Current Affairs Programmes: Have you got an angle on the latest business news? Are you good at spotting trends? Have you got advice on best practises for your sector? Programmes like Business Breakfast on Newstalk, The Last Word on Today FM and Morning Ireland feature experts every day on their business slots. These experts are people just like you.

Lifestyle/Light Entertainment: Programmes like the Tom Dunne Show or the Ray D’Arcy show may not seem the most obvious vehicles for promoting your business. But lifestyle-oriented businesses, like wedding suppliers and furniture shops, can work their way onto the shows by offering advice to listeners. The Derek Mooney Show on Radio 1 regularly features business success stories and innovative products.

Local Radio: You cannot afford to ignore local radio. Local radio stations consistently have the biggest market share of any radio station in your area. They all have morning current affairs programmes which regularly cover business-related issues. WLRFM even ran its own Dragon’s Den style competition. And they too often have weekend business programmes.

Have you featured on radio? Have you found advertising or publicity on a programme more effective? And how did your radio experience benefit your business? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Derbhile Graham

Derbhile Graham

Every business has a story. Your story helps your business stand out from the crowd. It's your story that customers ultimately buy into. I help businesses tell their story using a three-step process. Define the story: Identify what you do, how you do it and above all, why you do it? Refine the story: Decide who's interested in your story and where to spread the word. Deliver the story: through blogs, newsletters, mailshots, social media posts, press releases and brochures.

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