Tweak Your Biz » Marketing » I Don’t Care Where You Tweet You Twat!

I Don’t Care Where You Tweet You Twat!



One of the most significant benefits mobile technology has brought to us is the ability to access the internet on the go (IMHO). Why, then, do some twitter users feel the need to inform their followers of where they are when they tweet? How many times have you read “Just walking down such a street” or “Sitting in a coffee shop”. The later one is generally followed by “and drinking a cup of Coffee”. Maybe it’s just me but I think it’s pretty clear that coffee is available in such places.

Let’s face it people, as much as we might like to think that everyone on twitter is dying to know where we are when we tweet, some places are just not worth talking about. Ok, so if you are at some event or conference that you think might be worth tweeting about then all good, at least you are giving your followers some useful information. The useful information being what is going on at the conference not that you happen to be there!

Or how many times have we seen “just arranged a meeting with @john this evening”. I mean really! If you have to tweet to John to tell him that you have just arranged a meeting with him I think you might as well stay at home as John may not be too switched on! Add to that the fact that most people don’t know John or give a hoot who you meet then you are just wasting a tweet.

Now if it wasn’t enough to tell @ John you were having a meeting some people feel the need to tell @John that the meeting went well after it finished. It almost sounds like the love sick “screenagers” on Bebo who are whispering sweet nothings back on forth to one and other to show the world how much there one day old relationship means ! Again, do we really care how your meeting went? Now, if you were to tell us, “I just closed a deal for 100k with @John from Nike” then if I was in the footwear business I would be interested or even if I’m not in that business I can see how it would be worth tweeting about and I might even “RT” it with a little “well done”.

I suppose what we need to do is to take a step back with a tweet and ask “ Is this tweet any use to @my_followers”.

@drofsocialmedia suggests 3 simple rules before tweeting !

Is this relevant to my audience or just me?

Will this information be useful to anyone but me?

Would I care if somebody I follow tweeted this?

The problem with poor tweets (I feel) is that they disengage the follower and then when you do tweet something useful that person might just miss it as they are not paying too much attention to your tweets anymore. Feel free to comment with your own “tweet” frustrations or suggestions for ensuring you are engaging your audience.

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This post is part of the SugarTone: Sweet Business Blogging Contest.



The Author:

Director of social media for an International Bestselling Author. Check out my site for more information. http://www.brianprenderville.com

Add Your Comment

  • http://blog.revahealth.com/ Caelen

    If you tend to tweet triviality such as where you are or who you are meeting then that’s probably why your followers are following you.

  • http://www.btbtraining.com/blog Niall Devitt

    A big tweeting challenge for me is being descriptive enough & leaving room for RTs, I know I sometimes mess it up. One thing that drives me nuts is business people who feel the need to share the more mundane details of their life, what they had for lunch, they need to collect their dry cleaning etc etc. Great post! thanks for sharing.

  • http://thisiswhatido.org/ Darragh Doyle

    Sorry, but this from someone with 7 followers and who follows 19 people? Who joined on March 16 of THIS YEAR? http://twitter.com/drofsocialmediaSeriously Brian, you have got to be kidding me here.

    I’m not claiming to be any sort of twitter “expert” or even someone who knows how the hell to use it “properly” but if this is how you’re approaching it. you are completely – COMPLETELY – missing one of the major benefits of twitter that I see – it brings personality to conversation and you can engage with them.

    I, for one, don’t want to hear only business stuff. Because that’s boring. I don’t want to only see promotional, marketing, selling, pimping or “informative” posts about a business because that’s all press release stuff. I want to see personality – I want to see people saying “hello” and having manners and engaging. Like, I mean it’s fine to give your three points above, but…

    Is this relevant to my audience or just me?

    WHO CARES? If it’s relevant to people, they’ll interact with it. If it’s not, they won’t. I mean, who cares that I had a cup of coffee today? http://twitter.com/darraghdoyle/status/10715138102 ? Well, no one – except my friend Marcus who wants to bring me to (and so tells me about) somewhere in London – http://twitter.com/marcusmacinnes/status/10715266568. See that’s cool. Makes us more than just “twitter friends”. There’s an opportunity for conversation there. Perhaps a bad example, but still, relevant. Your twitter account is YOUR OWN. Talk about what YOU’RE interested in, what YOU’RE passionate about and what you want to talk about. If other people have similar interests, they’ll talk to you. I mean, I find Mark Little on Twitter fascinating for the sheer breadth of news he tweets – I don’t read all the links he tweets, but I think it’s great that he has so much interest in it. I follow PEOPLE on twitter, not PERSONAS.

    The only exception to this I can think of are information channels, service channels or those representing organisations. I want Eircom (for example) not to tell me they’re having a coffee, but that they’re fixing problems. Doesn’t mean they can’t say Good morning though if I say that to them.

    Will this information be useful to anyone but me?

    If you’re doing it for this reason – and only this reason – give up now. Because you’ll drive yourself mad and you’ll never get the opportunity to show who you are. I mean, if you’re doing that only for “information for others” and not “stuff I find interesting/funny/worth sharing”, how will I know if you’re the type of person that I could do business – or have a cup of coffee – with?

    Would I care if somebody I follow tweeted this?

    Why would you compare yourself to anyone else? You’re not any other person. You’re you. Let us get to know you, no matter where you are or where you work – you’re still one person behind a keyboard talking to other people.

    I treat twitter like I do Grafton Street in Dublin. There’s plenty going on, there’s shops, entertainers, flower sellers, musicians, people trying to sell stuff, promote things, show their services etc and then there’s loads of people I know – so if I want to talk to Meteor or Vodafone I can, if I want to find out about a show, I can, if I want to talk to some PR expert, I can – and I can also talk to people as I pass saying “hey, how’s it going, fancy a coffee?” and maybe end up doing business.

    I’ve advised and worked with a number of organisations, PR companies, arts organisations, events and people on how they should “be” on twitter – everyone from Eircom to Bosco – and I always say the same thing “Be yourself. Be funny, be nice, be honest, be direct” and you’ll find the rest follows.

    I have to say – this is possibly the most bullshit ridden posts I have *EVER* read on Bloggertone and is a complete shame that it was published. Brian, I don’t know you, have never met or heard of you, but, in fairness, practise what you preach and speak with the authority of experience, not setting yourself up as some sort of “expert” when it’s obvious, even in the way that you approached me about this article – http://twitter.com/drofsocialmedia/status/10719427130 – , that, no more than myself, you still have a lot to learn.

    Best of luck with it.

  • J Barry

    Every time I see a post on Twitter from people who don’t use it they say the same thing. They comment on how tweeters are only sending tweets about what they’re eating, where they are, etc., and rubbish the triviality of Twitter. They seem to miss the beauty of Twitter is engaging with people, yes, I may tweet about what I’m making for dinner, but that’s just one in the many tweets I send throughout the day that give people an idea of who I am. Sharing information about what I’m listening to, or watching, or where I’m going, gives an idea of the kind of person I am. It means I’ll connect with people who have the same interests. If I tweet I’m off for a pint in such and such a pub, 9 times out of 10, someone else may be there or someone who’s in town may pop in. Twitter may be an online medium but I’ve found that it has translated into a great face to face experience, especially in Dublin where it’s such a small community.

    I agree with Darragh, and think that before you call yourself an expert you should be fully immersed in the medium of which you claim your expertise.

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Caelen, I had a chuckle reading Brian’s article (I’m not a chit chatter myself) and reading Darragh’s comments too (some wisdom there – although I know a few people with multiple Twitter accounts, so I’d ease up there).

    But I really had a good laugh readng your comment. So true.

    Would you believe, I actually know a few people who feel more comfortable engaging with someone who tweets “I’m having my coffee now”. Not me. I’m never any good at small talk, and dry up completely as the day goes on. For some reason I’m totally incapable of any form of chit chat & small talk in the evening.

    Social media is such a social environment. We all have different people skills in the real world and it seems that these differences show up on social media too. Except in the real world we choose where we hang out and online some people expect everyone online to be like the people they are used to.

    I really think the people who complain most about social media, need to actually stop and spend a good bit of time just listening. If you don’t like the tweets in your feed, go out and listen to the conversations going on elsewhere. You’ve obviously hooked up with the wrong crowds. Listen a little bit all over the place and then decide where you want to stop and have conversations with people. It’s a little bit like in the real world, isn’t it?

    In addition to this, Darragh is right, people on are Twitter for different reasons… and these reasons may not fit in with your own. You just gotta find the right crowd of people to hang out with at the right times. Twitter lists are great for this.

  • http://www.socialmediadoctor.eu/ Brian Prenderville

    Hi Darragh,

    thanks for taking the time to respond to my post. I’m going to refer to your last paragraph now, i must nip out to a meeting then and will respond to the rest of your arguement on my return as I think you have some interesting points :)

    1) Just because you think it’s “bullshit” doesn’t mean it is but I respect your opinion as it’s just that yours ! just like mine is just that, mine :)

    2) While I am currently undertaking a PhD in the area of social media marketing, i have never professed to be an “expert” (YET) although I am quite happy to share my knowledge which I gain from my research with people and also my own thoughts on http://www.socialmediadoctor.eu , a name I selected as I thought it was a pun on “PhD” and also on sites such as this where i did a piece on “Social Media, History, Definition and scholarship http://bit.ly/9uFHRn. In fact the encouraging comments and votes for that piece has encouraged me to pen another entitled “Has facebook changed the definition of a friend” which I would be happy to hear your views on also ( I will let you know when I post it )

    Finally, for now ! I think it’s pretty cool that I got someone with 3,645 followers to start tweeting about me ;) even if I do only currently have 7 followers on my @drofsocialmedia a/c on twitter.

    ( I’ll comment on the rest of your response in about an hour)

  • http://www.socialmediadoctor.eu/ Brian Prenderville

    Good point Caelen, thanks for adding to the discussion.

  • http://www.channelship.ie/blog facundo

    I don’t use Twitter that much TBH but I’m happy to share both serious/biz and silly updates on FB. Besides this post’s content and severe contradiction by the author it’s good to see a nice opinion exchange triggered by Darragh (or the post? lol)!

  • http://www.socialmediadoctor.eu/ Brian Prenderville

    my pleasure Niall, I have come across have the same sentiments from many. @darraghdoyle puts forward an interesting arguement that I will be responding to in about an hour if you want to check it out.

  • http://www.channelship.ie/ Fred

    Loving the thread guys. Was really looking forward to a moment like this :)
    Twitter is a wonderful tool. To me, it’s all about “personalizing it”.
    It’s straight forward: you have the control to follow people of your choice. If you get annoyed by”I’m having a coffee”, either you can learn from that stranger and get to know him/her better or simply unfollow! Again, you’re in control to listen and learn from whoever you want.

  • http://www.socialmediadoctor.eu/ Brian Prenderville

    Hi J Barry,

    thanks for your comment. You raise some interesting points also. I will respond to your comments in about an hour when I respond to Darragh’s. I have already posted an initial response to him if you want to check it out in the mean time.

  • http://richardmclaughlin.biz/ McLaughlin

    Darragh,

    according to http://howlonghaveyoubeentweeting.com/ I have been on Twitter 2 years, 10 months, 2 weeks, 5 days. A year less than ev and a month less than you. Like you, ‘m not a twitter expert and with only 6000 tweets, I am not really that active. I am not in the process of getting a PhD in social media, hell I never took the time to finish university.

    Having said that, if I had posted this article instead of Brian, would you have come back with the same comment and called it bullshit? Just like I agree with your Grafton Street example (I used to live in Foxrock, I know GS quite well) I agree with what Brian writes.

    I don’t care that someone is going to town to meet a high school friend and I won’t tweet that I will. (BTW, I am leaving home in about 20 minutes to meet Pat Reardon, a high school buddy, at the Eiffle Tower) I did just boil water for tea, but I won’t tweet that either.

    The only things that I will tweet are things that other people may find interesting. I think this article is spot on (but I don’t like the title)

    Cheers

    http://twitter.com/_McLaughlin

  • http://thisiswhatido.org/ Darragh Doyle

    Hey there Richard, thanks for the comment.

    If you had posted the same article, I’d have done exactly what I did with Brian – go straight to the twitter account and see the “authority” of the person posting – and by “authority”, I mean the level of engagement, how interested they are, how much communicating they do on twitter and how they use it, and can, in turn, feel they can advise people on or dictate how people should use twitter. Seriously though, how can you advise people on a medium when your account is 3 days old?

    For example, going through your tweets of just the last month, have you ever said “Good morning?” Have you ever responded to anyone who has spoken to you? Has anyone ever spoken to you on there? You tweet a mixture of funny quotes, of links and you RT a hell of a lot, but that’s just an information channel to me – no personality, no engagement, no understanding of what it is. Fine, you have far more followers than I ever have, but how many people do you follow? How many people interact with you? How many people on there do you *know*? It seems almost like you’re following a top-ten list of “How to be on twitter” and not deviating at all.

    People can use twitter for whatever they want to. My comment was never to say they couldn’t – my point was not to listen to these “rules” as if they were gospel and to find out yourself. It’s just a website. How you are on it will dictate how other people interact with you on it.

    Neither am I suggesting that people should tweet the mundane details – my point is not to listen to people telling you NOT to tweet them because you think they’re boring. I may not necessarily respond to you telling me you’re off to meet a friend at the Eiffel Tower, but I might remember that you’re in Paris and ask you something about it another time. It’s just conversation. That’s what I use it for anyways.

  • Anonymous

    Love the banter here. I think like anything else in life we should not be too critical of how others use Twitter. I love the fact that many people are very business like during work hours and can kick back with some humourous tweets as they engage socially in the evening. As @darraghdoyle says – ”
    People can use twitter for whatever they want to.” I can’t argue with that.

  • Anonymous

    I think with things like this it becomes really clear that people approach Twitter from really different angles. I’m not going to say there’s a right way or a wrong way to go about these things, there’s no perfect approach. People will tend to do what they’re good at, or find a way to make what they’re good at applicable to what they’re doing. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that, it’s just how we are.

    Like Darragh though, for me Twitter is more about personality than about a pure information stream. I enjoy the fact that, when I ask how they’re doing, the guys from @eircomconnect tell me how their day is going, not just what they’re working on. It’s a small enough thing, but it’s there.

    Similarly, I’m no Twitter expert, nor am I studying for a social media PhD, so maybe my approach is wrong here. Still one of the things that I’ve really enjoyed from Twitter is getting recommendations from people who buy from the business I work for. They are, almost by definition, people with similar interests to me, so when I’m looking for a new book to read, I don’t hesitate to ask them about it…

    Days later, if I tell people that I’m reading Doctor Glas, there may seem to be no reason for me to do it, but there are people out there for whom it’s interesting.

    I won’t talk about keeping ‘the conversation’ going, or ‘engaging with your audience.’ Twitter is a channel for a less formal kind of interaction, both with people and with businesses. What you use that channel for is up to you, but as far as I’m concerned HUMANITY is the biggest thing going. If people know you’re a human being on the opposite side then you’ve done pretty much everything right.

    If you could be replaced with a capably scripted bot, you’ve probably not accomplished an awful lot, no matter how many tweets you have or how many followers.

    Just my two cents,

    M

  • http://twitter.com/drofsocialmedia Brian Prenderville

    Hi again Daragh,

    so here is the second half of my response……

    At the end of the last post to you I commented on how cool I thought it was that someone such as yourself with 3,645 followers on twitter was tweeting about little old @drofsocialmedia with just 7 followers. I would like to add that I think it’s uber amazing how someone such as McLaughlin with 39,757 followers is now tweeting about this blog! Because I want to remain as impartial as I can I won’t thank McLaughlin for his support of the article :)

    So you seem to have addressed my 3 suggested simple rules before tweeting. I will then reply to your comments.

    1) I suggested: Before you tweet ask yourself “Is this relevant to my audience or just me”?
    You said : Who Cares ! If it’s relevant to people they will interact, if it is not they won’t.

    I suppose my issue with not caring if your post is relevant is (as I stated in the blog) that a possibility exists that your audience disengages with you and doesn’t pay any serious attention to your tweets when you really want them to. However, I take some interesting points from other commentators to this blog

    “ if you tend to tweet triviality such as where you are meeting then that’s probably why your followers are following you! @Caelen.

    “You just got to find the right crowd of people to hang out with at the right times” @Cindy King

    2) I suggested: Before you tweet ask.. “Will this information be useful to anyone but me”?
    You said: If you are doing this for a reason – and this is the only reason give up now.

    I’m sorry but from a business and marketing perspective I fundamentally disagree.

    3) I suggested: Would I care if somebody I follow tweeted this ?
    You said: Be yourself, Be funny, Be Nice, Be Honest, Be Direct and you’ll find the rest follows

    I agree one hundred percent but I don’t see how telling people where you are tweeting from for example, is being any of these.

    I am also going to bring in a comment from J Barry to this point…

    “ If I tweet I’m off for a pint in such and such a pub, 9 times out of 10, someone else may be there or someone who is in town may pop in”

    I can see where you are coming from J Barry, however, would you ring or text everyone in your phone book no matter where they were based to tell them you were heading into town ? What I might do is send a DM to 5 or 6 people that I know work in the area wondering if they are available. For example, a social media company in London DM’ d me this morn to know if I would be available for coffee sometime. So I engage with that as to be honest I feel somewhat flattered and I know the guy is engaging with me. If he had just tweeted a general tweet like “ I have coffee in starbucks in London every morning” I probably wouldn’t have taken much notice and most likely not contacted him the next time I’m in London but now I will be sure to.

    From what I gather people commenting on this post have different ideas ( which is what makes debates like this interesting and I hope we hear lots more views) on this post and just what Engagement Marketing, a term coined by a guy called Alan Moore is all about. Just on that note this guy wrote a pretty good book on this and would be worth a read. I will be doing a review on it soon and will present it on my latest site http://www.socialmediadoctor.eu if your interested.

    Best Regards
    Brian

  • Anonymous

    Nearly missed an opportunity. Anyone want to connect with me on Twitter, feel free to do so at http://twitter.com/careerscoacheu

  • http://twitter.com/drofsocialmedia Brian Prenderville

    thanks for your comment Mark, Some good points raised, particularly, the piece about interaction between people and business. For me it’s the balance that is the important thing :)

  • http://twitter.com/drofsocialmedia Brian Prenderville

    thaks for ur comments gregfry, Have to agree with that myself ! People can use twitter for whatever they want :)

  • http://twitter.com/drofsocialmedia Brian Prenderville

    thanks for your comments Fred.

    although not so sure about it being as straight forward as you say :)

  • http://twitter.com/drofsocialmedia Brian Prenderville

    thanks for your comments McLaughlin, In hindsight the title prop wasn’t the best. I was trying to conjure interest and humour ! Maybe Twitter Bug may have been better than Twat. I hope I did not cause any offence to anyone with the title.

  • http://www.wchingya.com wchingya

    Interesting points to ponder from different perspectives. :) Both have good reasons. Personally I prefer to read informative tweets but don’t mind a few casual ones too – a chance to know something extra about the person I’m following. I once talked about guitars with a lady I met on Twitter, it was not planned but I had fun during the chat. Ease off the info-overload awhile.

    Moderate the tweets would be my opinion. However, some people do use Twitter for fun only so I respect that. It’s a matter of preferences, glad that we have Twitter Lists and freedom to choose who to follow. :)

    @wchingya
    Social/Blogging Tracker

  • http://thisiswhatido.org/ Darragh Doyle

    Brian, fair play for commenting. We’ll have to agree to disagree on any number of your points, your understanding or your approach, but it’s only the internet after all and if you can make money from it that way, then fair play to you.

    Best of luck with your studies – I hope you learn a lot.

  • http://twitter.com/drofsocialmedia Brian Prenderville

    thanks for the comment @wchingya , nicely put :)

  • Pawel

    nothing like a nice healthy debate lol. Loving the title … BOLD but Beautiful !!!

  • http://twitter.com/drofsocialmedia Brian Prenderville

    thanks Pawel, Might be a good book title :)

  • http://www.globalcopywriting.com/ globalcopywrite

    Hi Brian,

    Frankly, you lost me with the title. You should be aware the final word in your title, in some countries, is considered a very offensive vulgarity with strong misogynistic overtones. I doubt that’s what you intended but, take my word, it doesn’t travel.

  • http://richardmclaughlin.biz/ McLaughlin

    No offense at all, just voicing my opinion because the SugarTone contest has a vote on the title and I don’t know who votes or how. Just tossing my vote out there.

  • http://richardmclaughlin.biz/ McLaughlin

    How many Twitter accounts do you have Darragh?

    I have 3 that I can think of. I probably have at least one more that I made and just can’t remember. I have one account that has about 15k followers and tweet all things green (not Irish green, but ecology green). I log in to that account maybe once a week. Followers keep growing, the account keeps appearing on lists, it’s really kind of neat because the account has no one ever interacting.

    Am I doing that wrong? You feel that you are the expert that can just my name account, so can you please pass judgment on that second account.

    ooooh, wait you are not “claiming to be any sort of twitter “expert” or even someone who knows how the hell to use it “properly” Please claim to be an expert and better than everyone on Twitter, it’s the position you express.

    Did you think that Brian might have a named Twitter account? Or one he uses for a business? I’m having a a blank, what song tells us to believe half of what we see and none of what we hear? Looks can be deceiving.

    My use of Twitter “advertise” a post, blog, SugarTone contest or whatever.
    My use of email, skype, phones and Twitter DM. Interaction with people.

    I don’t want to read about peoples private lives on twitter so I don’t tweet about mine.

    I don’t cuss on twitter. We all choose how we tweet, and that is a choice. The one thing I didn’t like about this article was the word Twat in the title. Since SugarTone has votes on best title I said that I didn’t like it.

    Darragh I wish you well in life. May the road rise to meet you and all that stuff.

  • http://www.socialmediadoctor.eu/ BrianPrenderville

    thanks for your comments glogalcopywrite. I guess it won’t be an international best seller after all ( Sorry Pawel !) Indeed, no offence was intended and I will take your point on board.

  • Pawel

    and there I was looking forward to a free copy !

    misogynistic overtones or not, this article has been on the homepage of this site for the last 2 days !!! has provoked perhaps one of the most interesting debates that I have read on here and has attracted a serious number of votes in from what I can gather is a short period of time. So there must be something right with the title which again for me is Bold but Beautifully thought provoking !

  • http://www.btbtraining.com/blog Niall Devitt

    Darragh,

    Thanks for taking the time to comment.

    I agree largely with what you say and would agree that of course there are no hard and fast rules when using Twitter,individuals are entitled to use Twitter in whatever fashion works for them.

    For me the real question here is what if you are using Twitter for biz?

    You could actually extend the question and say what if you are using it for B2C? or what if you are using it for B2B? Is this something you need to consider? Will it have an impact on how you use it?

    Brian may lack experience but the point he makes about the conversation is one I have heard many times from business people who have chosen either not to use or stop using Twitter. Rightly or wrongly the perception exists within the business world that much of the conversation is of low value.

    Let me make the point a different way (I am not trying to be smart here) you used the word “bullshit” in your last paragraph. If you knew me personally, you would know that it is a word I am quite fond of, I have no problem using it with my friends etc. However in a professional context, giving a presentation, during a meeting, It is a word I will not use because of the risk that it would be interpreted in a negative fashion. I would even extend this point further and say that if you consider different cultures, it is lightly to contain even more risk professionally. (Also see Sarah’s comments below on Brian title)

    I am pretty sure that if you were giving a presentation, It’s not a word you would choose to use either. However, online the same rules don’t seem to apply. Why is that? Is the professional environment online all that different from a face to face situation. I don’t think that it is.

    The point here is that when using these tools for biz, It is not how we feel personally or indeed our own opinion that it is important, It is the feelings & opinions of the people/prospects/customers/companies (and as Sarah highlights, the where) that we are attempting to engage with that matters the most.

    If like me your market is the business community on Twitter, to be effective, I must endeavor to respect their rules, their expectations and not mine. I have absolutely no difficulty in telling them details about the more mundane details of my life but for the moment I remain unconvinced that that is something they would like to hear about. This is not hard & fast as I say and I have on occasion cracked a joke etc :-) By the way, I don’t think yours are that bad and Ive had a chuckle at them from time to time.

    If you think about it, the question about using Twitter for biz is not a Twitter question, it is a question of how well you know your market, how well do you know your customers, how effective you are at giving them what the want. Unfortunately in many cases, the person entrusted with using Twitter for organisations in not the same person that can answer these questions. All too often, the person who could really use Twitter effectively is the same person that will give out about the quality of the conversations and there lies the problem.

    Lastly, just want to point out that Bloggertone is open to all professionals who want to blog regardless of the differences in opinions.

  • http://richardmclaughlin.biz/ McLaughlin

    You are right, and I just love when people tell me what is wrong with my twitter account, my blog or my choice of car color. People don’t know why I’ve made any of the choices, but they are willing to correct me – even though they all work perfectly for me.

  • http://www.globalcopywriting.com/ globalcopywrite

    Hi Brian,

    Believe me, I’ve been caught in the same trap on more than one occasion. I named my company Global Copywriting to reflect my experience – I’ve lived and worked in commercial environments on 5 continents. Suffice it to say, there have been blunders.

    For example, in America where I was born, we say someone is “shagging beer” if they go to the bar and order a round instead of ordering from a waitperson. When I moved to England, I wasn’t sure how the whole pub thing worked so I suggested to a new colleague that I would pay for a round if he “shagged for me”. You can’t imagine how long it took the all-male gathering of computer programers to recover from their convulsive laughter and explain my faux pas. This was before the shagadelic era of Austen Powers so I was completely ignorant.

    I got in trouble the first time I visited Australia to do sales training when I announced one morning I was finally over my jetlag and feeling spunky. Where I come from that simply means perky and energetic. The Australians had a fleeting moment of thinking that sales training was going to get a whole lot more fun.

    As a general rule of thumb, I think it’s always better to stay conservative when you’re writing for business especially when there’s an international audience involved. You just never know who you’re going to unintentionally offend. While a little controversy is always good for readership (as your post so aptly demonstrates) you want it to be for the right reasons.

    Don’t worry, no offense taken. I appreciate your reply.

    Cheers,
    Sarah

  • http://patphelan.net Pat Phelan

    Its not often I feel like jumping into an argument, I have started and got involved in an enough of them at this stage.
    Brian you have no experience of twitter, you are seven days engaging on it.
    If you have another account which is going for years lets see it?
    You are just another one of those brassers who want to charge for something and pretend that what they know is of value, fair play to ya, hats off, but dont be dressing it up as anything else, come straight out and say it
    As for McLaughlin just another number gatherer, we have seen them for years and we will see them for years to come, he is running a script for followers, see how his numbers are so close together, its a dead giveaway.
    Niall, cop your self on boy will ya.
    oh and by the way, here longer than all of you, you cant claim numbers on that :-)

  • http://twitter.com/thejetset Ben

    We all love Darragh’s terrible jokes :D

  • http://twitter.com/BYRNEC Chris Byrne

    Brian, there are so may colors in the rainbow. Must we always paint the sky blue, like you? @BYRNEC

  • http://twitter.com/drofsocialmedia Brian Prenderville

    Hi Chris,

    thanks for your comment. As per my responses above to people I think it’s clear that I’m pretty happy for people to paint the sky whatever colour they want. In fact, I encourage it as when one mixes colours, for example Blue as you attribute to me, with lets say Yellow we get a fantastic new colour Green.

  • http://twitter.com/drofsocialmedia Brian Prenderville

    Hi Sarah,

    I got a great little giggle reading your post ! To be honest, when I was writing the article and picked the title I had no idea that it would get to the front page and illicit such interest :) I am delighted it has and that we have got such an interesting debate going on around it thus far, and hopefully more to come !

    still laughing at the thought of the guys face in bar ! (excellent)

  • http://twitter.com/drofsocialmedia Brian Prenderville

    Hi Pat,

    glad the article got you to “jump” into the debate. I’d just like to point out however, that, to-date,I have never charged a penny or a cent for any of my opinions, research or information that i have gathered as a result of my study into social media marketing :)

    However, in line with my research, I have exchanged on occasion my services, advice and knowledge that I have gained to campaigns in return for being able to document the information, some of which such as http://bit.ly/9uFHRn, I will continue to share with communities such as this, on my new blog http://www.socialmediadoctor.eu and at academic conferences ! I might even aspire one day to write a book on it but I won’t be calling it ” I don’t care what you tweet you twat ” as per the advice given by Sarah below :)

    Again I am not claiming to be any sort of expert, I learn new things about social media everyday. However, one day I do hope to have amassed enough knowledge to be able to call myself an expert.

    In relation to your comment “oh by the way, here longer than all of you” ……… I started running with a friend of mine about a year ago. When we started I used to outrun her , she put in so much hard work now I can’t keep up with her :)

  • http://patphelan.net Pat Phelan

    You answer tells me nothing Brian
    Absolutely nothing
    Blogging, SM and twitter in my opinion are about transparency, an area going by your answer in which you are seriously lacking.
    Best of luck with getting that .eu domain up the ladder, again a massive lack of experience shining through there.
    I find that the people who feel they make a living in this arena are quickly found out as leeches and people who genuinely want to help build a community are embraced and welcomed.
    I remain confused as to which of the above categories you fit into.
    I have my opinion though.

  • http://twitter.com/drofsocialmedia Brian Prenderville

    thanks Pat,

    an advocate of social media for business marketing (branding in particular) I have no problems with businesses making money through the use of these mediums by connecting with their customers.In fact, I 100% encourage it.

    Hopefully, as you see more of me around here you will become of the opinion that I am not a leech, just somebody that is fasinated by the world of Social Media. I admit that I have a lot to learn, but then don’t we all.

    cheers
    Brian

  • http://twitter.com/drofsocialmedia Brian Prenderville

    thanks Darragh

  • http://www.fortysomethingbride.com/ Colleen Cole

    Hi Brian, I have been on Twitter since the middle of last year, and I’m not sure I agree with your article. Twitter has replaced the water cooler for a lot of people, especially freelancers and creatives, and SAHMs. Reading little tidbits of my twitter friends days makes me feel more connected. It’s pretty rare to see someone post that they are having a cup of coffee (well, actually, I see a bit of that on Monday mornings, and have known to be a culprit too!), but I am interested if someone is having a good meal in a restaurant, or cooking something different or simple for dinner. I have tweeted about meals and included step by step instructions and photos, and seen my followers increase, so I don’t think I am turning anyone off. I have over 550 organic followers on my personal Twitter account and 250+ on my business account, I don’t go recruiting followers, they find me, and they follow me, and for some reason, they like even my most banal posts.

    Twitter is a conversation, it’s the new water cooler, engage with it, and you may start to see it differently. I don’t recommend following me, if you don’t want to know about the banalities of my life though, because they do slip in from time to time.

  • http://twitter.com/drofsocialmedia Brian Prenderville

    thanks for your comments Colleen,

    I would have no problem following you for your cooking tips and the fact that you are into organic and I could forgive the occasional banalities. I suppose the point I was trying to make is that I would prefer to see more info such as your cooking tips than your water drinking habbits :) but I totally respect that people use twitter in their own ways :)

    Someone who commented on my blog http://www.socialmediadoctor.eu summed things up pretty nicely which you might find interesting. She said

    ” I think also from an anthropological pov it’s the little things that really make up the bigger pattern of our lives. Since I don’t drink coffee, the meaning would be different for those who know me to read that I am ‘drinking coffee…’ to the mundane disinterest you’re talking about”

    I suppose twitter is like any language medium – there are always aspects of heteroglossia and communication is always dialogic: the meaning is produced by the speaker (writer) and listener (follower) so each follower creates a new meaning for each tweet.”

    I found this pretty interesting and thought provoking and a good way of kind of summing up a lot of the agreements and disagreements with the article.

    Cheers
    Brian

  • Tony

    Fair play Brian. You seem to have upset a few lads. Don’t worry about that. You seem to be conducting yourself a lot better both here and on Twitter than some of the gurus who are knocking you.

  • http://www.insideview.ie topgold

    One thing for sure, a lot of people don’t like having rules about tweeting shoved up their noses because “conversation” is what you make it. Personally, I don’t enjoy the banality of many twitterstreams or the casual one-on-one cross-talk and because some exceptionally “conversational” people clutter up my timeline, I read them only as RSS a few times a week. I also have five Twitter accounts and eight specialised Twitter lists where I can manage the public flow of tweets.

    I think it’s unreasonable to expect Twitter to serve up meaningful business intelligence unless you distill its flow. And you certainly cannot expect the Twitterverse to conform to “best practise” imposed from above. Unless you’re really good at herding cats.

    I know several HR and recruiting specialists who use public ramblings on Twitter to be synonymous with time-wasting so that’s a health warning I pass along to third level Irish students who take a social media module as part of their creative multimedia degree programme.

    But plenty of others (see below) think twitter should be like a watering hole where you can all splash around together. And it’s not nice to piss in their watering hole so move along.

  • http://www.insideview.ie topgold

    I’ve been on Twitter for nearly four years now and I renew my Twitter subscription every December because of @darraghdoyle’s jokes.

  • http://www.insideview.ie topgold

    FWIW, Apple’s global success with the iPad may be dented because of the potentially off-putting product name.

  • Paul @ Penhire

    The ratio of tweeting to reading tweets seems to me to be Twitter’s Achilles’ Heel. And being, at a guess, very much in favour of tweeting, is partly down to the banality. But is also connected with the nonsense of following hundreds (not to mention thousands) of people. That strikes me as purely a popularity/celebrity impulse. To engage meaningfully and sustainably with an online group, going much over 100 seems to me to be pushing it. I find myself retreating from it more and more.

  • http://cindyking.biz/ Cindy King

    Interesting comments Topgold. I think there are similarities in how we both use Twitter.

    No one else can really see how well Twitter works for me because it all happens outside of my public Twitter feed. So I don’t have a stream of friendly chit chat in the public feed. But I do connect continually to new & old Twitter friends in a meaningful way behind the scenes. So I guess I have a more rapid conversion outside of Twitter.

    I’d be interested to know if you get lots of DMs and emails like I do. And what you feel about your conversion rate in bringing casual Twitter friends to become meaningful contacts outside of Twitter.

    I’d love to see some case studies on that, but not sure we will.

    I just listened to Brian Solis this weekend on a Warren Whitlock talk show, and it really struck home to me that there are no specific rules in creating your social media strategy and what tactics a business should use. Everything depends on what you want to get out of it and how you should go about it to get there. There are just too many parameters to make any generalizations.

  • http://www.btbtraining.com/blog Niall Devitt

    Pat, ill go one better than that, I know you and Darragh are two of the most effective users of Twitter in Ireland. How’s about doing a post talking about your experience? and we will be delighted to publish it on here.

  • http://richardmclaughlin.biz/ McLaughlin

    I don’t run a script pat, except to unfollow. I do auto-follow and then I just unfollow people that have followed and then unfollowed me. Quitter tells me who stopped following and when I feel that I’ve seen a lot I use one of the unfollow tools. It used to be huitter, but that no longer works.

  • http://richardmclaughlin.biz/ McLaughlin

    3 years and 3 months. Much longer than most, but 9 months short of 4 years kind of a long stretch to say nearly 4 years.

  • Anonymous

    Brian

    Do I enjoy reading tweets like “sitting in a coffee shop”? No and this is because I am jealous that I don’t have time for a cappuccino :-(

    I say if your twitter strategy is working for you then keep going – be it 100% biz focused, 100% social focused or somewhere in the middle.

    The way I see it is that different SM tools work for different people and everyone has their own favourites. Also people have different objectives in using SM and will therefore use tools differently.

    For me this makes it difficult to state that one SM tool is better than another and also makes it difficult to have uniformed rules of engagement. What turns me on (tool choice or how it should be used) could turn others off and visa versa.

    You certainly opened up the debate and I enjoyed reading everyone’s opinions.

    Paul “A twitter user but not a twitter expert or perhaps I am underselling myself because it’s not exactly rocket science” Mullan

  • Brian Prenderville

    thanks Paul,

    I am in the process of creating an overall response to the comments so far. I love your last line :)

  • Anonymous

    Wow, what a lot of interest in this article and it’s great to see all the different points of views! Perhaps this is an appropriate time to take a look and see what info can be gained from the discussion so far!

    ***Experience***

    Just how can we define experience on twitter? It was eluded to many times in the comments received that experience can be correlated to

    a) amount of followers that one has

    “ Sorry, but this from someone with 7 followers and who follows 19 people” (Darragh Doyle @ Brian Prenderville)

    Conversely, it was suggested that amount of followers has no relationship with experience

    “As for McLaughlin just another number gatherer, we have seen them for years and we will see them for years to come” (Pat Phelan @ _McLaughlin)

    b) Length of time on twitter.

    “Who joined on March 16 of THIS YEAR? http://twitter.com/drofsocialmediaSeriously Brian, you have got to be kidding me here” (Darragh Doyle @ Brian Prenderville)

    “oh and by the way, here longer than all of you, you cant claim numbers on that :-)” (P at Phelan)

    And again the opposite argument was put forth

    “according to http://howlonghaveyoubeentweeting.com/ I have been on Twitter 2 years, 10 months, 2 weeks, 5 days. A year less than ev and a month less than you.” ( _Mcloughlin 39,981 followers @ Darragh Doyle 3,678 followers)

    So just what is it that gives somebody the right to call themselves experienced with twitter? Is it length of time or number of followers for example, as suggested and contradicted throughout our debate or is it none of the above – is technology changing faster than people and as a result we can’t answer such questions? As both a social marketing enthusiast and a researcher I guess I tend to agree with the proposition that there are always answers to questions but that’s just me, what do you think?

    ***Running a Script***

    Again, we seemed to have conflicting views on whether or not is “ok” to run a script
    “he is running a script for followers, see how his numbers are so close together, its a dead giveaway” (Pat Phelan negative connotations@ _McLaughlin)

    “I do auto-follow and then I just unfollow people that have followed and then unfollowed me” (_Mclaughlin positive connotations@Pat Phelan)

    I don’t know much about running scripts but I found myself questioning whether or not it mattered if one runs a script or not. Does it matter how you get your followers? will people have a look for a bit and “decide where you want to stop” (Cindy King) and unfollow you if they don’t like what they see anyway ? Or is scripting the behaviour of “brassers who want to charge for something (Pat Phelan).

    Looking at it from another angle should we congratulate those that grow organically such as Colleen Cole who amassed 500 followers using such an approach or could she have got more numbers faster using a script? If so, would the numbers be of any real value or be of such value that they could get her just as many if not more relevant followers due to the affordances and reach offered by such scripts? I’m not sure, what do you think? (P.S Colleen you prob noticed I associated the word organic with the food you were talking about in my response to your post yesterday, Whoops – was very tired!)

    ***Etiquette***

    We saw some emotive words being used….

    I Don’t Care Where You Tweet You Twat (Brian Prenderville – Title)

    “this is possibly the most bullshit ridden posts I have *EVER* read on Bloggertone and is a complete shame that it was published” Daragh Doyle @ Bloggertone)

    In response we saw some criticism of the above

    “I think this article is spot on (but I don’t like the title)” ( _McLoughlin)

    “You should be aware the final word in your title, in some countries, is considered a very offensive vulgarity with strong misogynistic overtones” (Global Copywright aka Sarah @Brian Prenderville)

    “you used the word “bullshit” in your last paragraph” + “ in a professional context, giving a presentation, during a meeting, It is a word I will not use because of the risk that it would be interpreted in a negative fashion” Niall Devitt @ Darragh Doyle)

    “I don’t cuss on twitter” + “if I had posted this article instead of Brian, would you have come back with the same comment and called it bullshit?” (_McLaughlin @ Darragh Doyle)

    So should we be allowed “cuss” on Twitter and use whatever words we want in order to make our arguments more emotive? is this what our followers want ? or are we doing ourselves a disservice “as take my word, it doesn’t travel” (Global Copywrite aka Sarah @ Brian Prenderville) . Perhaps again it depends on the follwers who “create a new meaning for each tweet” (Rachel).

    I can’t speak for Darragh on this and I don’t know enough about how words are perceived or accepted in the different countries, however, I did think my title was catchy and it does seem to have created some response. Or hass it ? What do you think ?

    ***Title***

    Did the title have anything to do with the fact this article has remained on the home page and received so much attention? or is it related to the fact that I got Darragh Doyle, one of the most the most respected users on twitter according to Niall Devitt (C/0 Bloggertone) to enter the debate by tweeting him “Check out blog “I don’t care where you Tweet you Twat ! http://bit.ly/bXR8Ls”, who, in turn started to tweet comments such as

    I haven’t ranted in ages but this by a self-styled “Dr of Social Media” is BULLSHIT http://short.ie/uttercrap. Poor @bloggertone :(

    http://tweakyourbiz.com/marketing/2010/03/19/i-don%E2%80%99t-care-where-you-tweet-you-twat/ << absolute crap from a "dr of social media"

    http://twitter.com/darraghdoyle/status/10815411281

    http://twitter.com/darraghdoyle/status/10815320821

    which were then picked up and re-tweeted by some of his followers , see below for some examples

    http://twitter.com/cloudsteph/status/10722105044
    http://twitter.com/anthonymcg/status/10721458297

    Or ! without the title would Darragh have bothered to click on the link to the blog in the first place ? I’m undecided, perhaps some of the people who posted about good title’s such as Niall and Cindy (I went looking for the articles to link but couldn’t remember where I saw them) could offer opinions as well as others.

    ***Best Practice***

    I guess if I was to copy all the quotes in relation to how it’s impossible to proffer a definitive list of best practice in relation to the use of twitter I would be copying an awful lot of info. Suffice to say the overall consensus was that this is not possible.

    While on the whole I agree that a twitter strategy should be designed to meet the needs and expectations of a business’s followers* and as a result no two twitter strategies can be the same, it is my contention that just like in the offline world business on line could be made much easier for companies if we can come up with some fundamental twittering principles which can lay the foundation for unique business strategies. However, that is just my opinion, and I 100% concur with Wchinga that we need “Interesting points to ponder from different perspectives”

    I look forward to reading any new comments and would like to offer an extract from my PhD as a way of provoking further thought on the matter…..

    It’s only the future…
    Technology is changing faster than markets,
    Markets are changing faster than customers,
    Customers are changing faster than organisations,
    and organisations are changing faster than the people who run them,
    (Philips, 2000:1)**

    Thanks for reading
    Brian

    * note the use of business followers as apposed to business – again as pointed out in some of the other articles here on Bloggertone that it is now the customers who dictate how business is run due to the power of social media)

    ** Philips, N. (2000) E-Motional Business, London, Pearson Education.

  • Anonymous

    P.S, Cindy – If you can get me access to a large number of people who will participate in a survey I would be happy to carry out the research you describe into conversion rates in bringing casual Twitter friends to become meaningful contacts outside of Twitter.

  • http://www.insideview.ie topgold

    I was a SXSW Twithead. Killed the first account because Jaiku was working better. Rejoined with a cluster of tweeple in Tipperary in December 2006. Officially, one of the first 100 Irish-based people on Twitter. Not that it matters much in the real world.

  • http://www.insideview.ie topgold

    Yesterday, I got 8 DMs, three direct texts and four phone calls arising from sending 30 tweets. I’m always below a 1-to-3 ratio in the DM space and I average around 20 tweets a day.

    The best measure of engagement comes from the number of direct connections on topics that create value.

  • http://richardmclaughlin.biz/ McLaughlin

    no, it doesn’t really matter. But it is pretty cool. :-)

  • Brian Prenderville

    Of Course it does ! Twitter is the real world :) The fact that you are from Tipperary makes it even more special :) Go on the Premier county !

  • http://www.btbtraining.com/blog Niall Devitt

    Thinking about it! perhaps there is a strange synergy between the original post and many of the re-actions in that: the post could have been interpreted as not respecting the folks who use Twitter (those who are experienced users) and some of the resulting re-actions could be interpreted as not respecting the author or the point of view.

    Very quickly what starts out as a difference of opinions, expressed well and with reason descends into a silly slanging match. Some of course may see this as harmless fun but the reality is that what’s one person’s fun is another’s cruel.

    As we attempt to come to terms with and deal with the very serious consequences of teenagers engaging in bullying online, perhaps we as adults, in an effort to lead by example SHOULD all play by one Twitter rule: RESPECT??

  • sianmaloney

    I have seen this topic brewing for a while and I have been biting my tongue. I think I would describe myself as a Mongrel Twitter user!! I am a business woman, mother, wife, sport lover, social media lover, chatter, website owner who also loves using Social Media as a great tool for learning things that I would never have known from marketing, IT, accounting to cooking, shopping and DIY!! But I have also made so many online friends and contacts that I would never have known. But I have started to notice in the last while that people have declared this sort of ownership on how people should use Twitter and it really irks me. As far as I was aware nobody could dictate to anybody how they used it. It is a Social Media tool. If you don’t like how a person is using it, don’t follow them. Don’t moan about it. It is your decision. Surely we should be encouraging people to become more techie friendly and not frighten them off by ridiculing them as they dip their toe in the water. I love a mixture of tweets. That is my decision. I love learning from my techie/marketing superiors and having banter with friends and often other Mums and Dads. Twitter is a fantastic resource. There are genuine people to be found on it who will give you fantastic help and support. But you have to work at building these relationships as well. I am a firm believer in treating others as you would like to be treated. So good luck with your title Brian!

  • Brian Prenderville

    thanks for your support Sian,

    The title does seem to have generated a lot of interest alright :) Hopefully, it is a competition winner.

    You know it’s funny ! as I was relaying all the comments to my partner last night I started to question whether there would be any twitter without the trivialities ? or would business people just use the likes of Igopeople and Smartha. So i’m now wondering do the trivialities just come with the territory and are they inextricably linked to the DNA that comprises Twitter !.

  • Brian Prenderville

    thanks for your comments Niall. Perhaps you might just clarify ? Are you suggesting that I engaged in in a silly “slanging match” ?

    I have always had a rule ! Respond to the content not the person. I felt that I had done this and not let myself engage in any such activities?

    I always respect other people, their opinions and their views. Even if I do not agree with them I listen to them , process the information and decide whether or not their arguement is better than mine and as a result, have on more than one occasion, changed my opinion ( see my response to sianmaloney above). Otherwise, the usefulness of blogging (for me) is undermined and pointless.

    Similarly, I expect others to respect my opinions, my points, my thought provoking arguements ( which i’m sure you will see more on bloggertone should it take off !) and my views.

    While I make no apologies for the piece that I have written, I would hate to think that anybody thought I was disrespecting them . I selected the controversial title because it was a competition for the best title ! like them or love them , they get people’s attention and encourage them to participate in the discussion, even if only to tell you that they don’t like it.

    Best Regards
    Brian

  • http://www.btbtraining.com/blog Niall Devitt

    I am suggesting that we all need to be careful to ensure that what starts as a difference of opinions doesn’t descend into a slanging match.

  • http://www.cgonlinemarketing.com/ Christina Giliberti

    Well… I’ve come in at a late stage and read a number of comments in the SM debate.
    Still, here’s my thoughts.

    The thing about social media is we embrace our ‘social self’. Instead of thinking business, relevant, topic etc, we just feel this urge to share….exactly as we would by talking to someone face to face.
    Obviously this style isn’t to everyone’s taste. I’m with you Brian in part, that mostly I don’t care much on the whole for the friv or everyday actions, but at other times I laugh my head off and I do see a need for them …
    It does feel strange to be so honest and it is raw in the sense that it isn’t always bred for a purpose (business/professional interest), but …. if we were all robotic and business-y, we would lose our unique identities and personalities.
    Self-expression and sometimes boredom or the need to speak out overides all else. We simply want to connect. Is that wrong? Who knows.

  • Brian Prenderville

    Hi Christina,

    your never too late to the debate :)

    thanks for your comments an an extremely interesting and eloquent point of view.

  • http://www.cgonlinemarketing.com/ Christina Giliberti

    Hi – Apparently the word ‘poke’ means bag in Scottish. I knew a woman who was told to leave a shop because she keeped shouting ‘I want a poke’ at the counter.
    Its the same as ‘pants’ meaning underwear here and trousers in the Us, as you know.
    We should be more in tune about these things, but we’re not!

  • http://twitter.com/IrishSmiley Frederique Murphy

    Thanks Sian, it’s a very useful post, whether you are new in business or to double check you are a-OK! I also think, it should be an ongoing education, and it always amazes me that very few cashier agents know how to handle such a query; I’ve got so many blank look when asking, could I please get a VAT invoice for this purchase? PS, depending on where the readers who are reading this live, they should check as the legal letterhead requirements are not the same, from country to country.

  • http://www.sianphillips.ie Sian Phillips

    Thank for the comment Frederique and for pointing out it’s different letterhead requirement in other countries. I hope it makes people more aware of what to look out for.

  • http://www.seefincoaching.com/blog Elaine Rogers

    Hi Sian,nI have invested in headed paper specifically for this purpose. Although, some accounting packages offer specific paper also.nI have a question/clarification: I have been asked specifically if I would like to receive soft copies of invoices from service providers, and I have agreed to this. But the hard copy has stopped as a consequence. nSo, from what you’re saying above, are they not abiding by legal requirements? (one company continued to send hard copies, and I actually contacted them to say not to bother) If I print them out myself, do they qualify as legal invoices?nnGreat post :)

  • http://www.sianphillips.ie Sian Phillips

    Hi Elaine, it’s not a legal requirement to post out an invoice if it has already been emailed it was just a suggestion to help as mentioned above. The points with ** against them are compulsory. Thanks for asking :)

  • http://www.sianphillips.ie Sian Phillips

    Hi Contractor Accountant. If you check my blog you will see the latest posts – it is updated regularly

  • http://twitter.com/emcg53 Eamon McGlade

    Excellent article that is so applicable to today’s business environment. Having been on the receiving end of a few negotiations that could have been used to script this article, I think the pertinent point is that you must be prepared to walk away. As difficult as this is to even countenance when every sale counts, being prepared to walk away helps both buyer and seller focused on the cost of failure to each party if they cannot reach agreement. It can also minimise bullying from the buyers side if they are just playing hard-ball but ultimately intend to purchase. That said there are some Alpha male buyer types out there looking for some payback for the last few years and their ship has well and truly come in.

  • http://websitesgiveback.com/blog/ Elena Patrice

    Very interesting thoughts here John. I’m in B2B sales and the way business is being done is definitely different. What I do is not a “high” ticket item and yet we still have to find ways to work with them and earn their business, especially since they’re bombarded constantly in my industry. For us, transparency, patience and empathy are key; all which work extremely well for us. This article intrigues me because I was wondering how the “big” boys and higher ticket market was fairing and dealing with things. Thank you for the information here, Iu2019m very appreciative!nu00a0nMuch kindness,nu00a0nElena

  • Johnogorman

    Hi Eamon, thanks for your thoughts. As you say knowing when to walk and when the deal isn’t good for both sides is key.

  • http://www.sianphillips.ie Sian Phillips

    Hi Kg29, I’m sorry to hear you have been caught like this. I suggest you get professional advice from a local accountant to you. Or maybe even the revenue can recommend what you can do. In future if paying over a lot of VAT always check the VAT number that your supplier is giving you and that it matches up with the address etc they are giving you. Good luck

  • Kg29

    Thanks sian