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How to build your Authenticity



Following on from the discussion on managing your authenticity I started thinking about ways one can develop as an authentic leader and whether there were actual steps that could be followed to build your authenticity?

The roots of authenticity obviously begin with oneself but where it really starts to grow and become effective is in the interaction between you and others, as authenticity is largely defined by what other people see in you.  So in order to develop ones authenticity it would seem that it is a combination of learning more about oneself and also more about other people.

While there’s many ways to do this and each person has to take their own path, I read an approach which Rob Goffee and Garetth Jones outline, that I think is worth sharing.  Their approach is broken down into three parts:

*        Getting to know yourself and your origins better

*        Getting to know others better

*        Connect to the Organisation context better

I’ll cover the first aspect in this post and the other two in the next.

Getting to know yourself and your origins

Goffe & Jones speak about ‘exploring your autobiography’ – what people and experiences in your early life have had the greatest impact on you? What are your most deeply held values? How do they inform your actions? What motivates you? When are the moments you say to yourself this is the real me?

Going back to my roots – hard to say without adding the ‘yeah’ at the end :-) But when is the last time you spent some time where you grew up? Met up with old friends? Walked familiar childhood paths?

And seeing as I’ve now the Odyssey track playing in my head – zippin’ up my boots – try and step out of your normal routine or comfort zone, take a risk, make a choice you’d normally  avoid.

Don’t be afraid of feedback – honest feedback is extremely valuable, ensure you not only ask people for their feedback but also enable them give it i.e. just listen – don’t try and qualify or reply.

I’m sure we’d all agree that none of the above seem like very difficult steps – everyone should be able to do at least one of them today, but which one will you do?



The Author:

Senior Manager with Pinnacle Project Partners and over the last 15 years have worked as a Project / Programme Manager, primarily within the Financial Services Sector here in Ireland, but also with clients in the UK, Holland, the US and New Zealand. I have worked on a number of significant large scale projects – ranging from process improvement & automation initiatives, to more traditional solution design & implementation projects. PMP™ certified and holder of a MBA (First Class Honours) from UCD Michael Smurfit Graduate Business School. Looking for outlet to share idea's / thoughts - particularly in the leadership space – and continue learning!

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  • nialldevitt

    “Don’t be afraid of feedback – honest feedback is extremely valuable, ensure you not only ask people for their feedback but also enable them give it i.e. just listen – don’t try and qualify or reply”Feedback empowers us so why do we fear it so :)

  • http://www.btbtraining.com/blog Niall Devitt

    “Don’t be afraid of feedback – honest feedback is extremely valuable, ensure you not only ask people for their feedback but also enable them give it i.e. just listen – don’t try and qualify or reply”

    Feedback empowers us so why do we fear it so :)

  • Anonymous

    Think people fear feedback because nobody likes being criticised !!

    Why we’re so sensitive to hearing about our imperfections I think is still an ongoing deabte between the psychologists – but I blame the parents :-)

    However, what is clear is that those that learn to adapt to feedback can really use it to their advantage – maybe a topic worth further thought / investigation in itself?

    But anyway thanks Niall for the feedback ;-)

    Kelvin

  • KelvinGillen

    Think people fear feedback because nobody likes being criticised !!Why we're so sensitive to hearing about our imperfections I think is still an ongoing deabte between the psychologists – but I blame the parents :-) However, what is clear is that those that learn to adapt to feedback can really use it to their advantage – maybe a topic worth further thought / investigation in itself?But anyway thanks Niall for the feedback ;-) Kelvin